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What does Lottery Health Research provide grants for?

Lottery Health Research grants may support:

  • translational research projects
  • shared research equipment
  • post-doctoral fellowships
  • PhD Scholarships.

There are two online request forms available, one for translational research projects or shared research equipment requests and one for post-doctoral fellowship or PhD scholarship requests. All requests must be supported by a budget or quotes and all relevant approvals.

What type of budget do I need?

When you request a grant, you need to provide a budget for what you plan to do. The type of budget will depend on what you need the money for.

Grants can be for your business as usual running costs (operational costs) or for project costs and may be for just one year or, if you are making a request to Lottery Community, Community Organisations Grants Scheme (COGS), Community Leadership Fund (CLF) or Support for Volunteering Fund request, for up to three years. It is important to remember that grants are usually a contribution to part of your organisations running costs or the cost of delivering a project.  

What the money will be put towards  The type of budget you will need to provide when submitting your request

One year’s operating costs

Your organisation’s operating budget showing the amount your organisation expects to earn (revenue) and spend for a financial year. Your budget can be for your current financial year or the next financial year.

One year’s project costs

A project budget showing all the costs to your organisation of delivering the project and any other funding your organisation may have gained to put towards the project’s delivery.

 Multi-year – operating costs

Your organisation’s operating budget showing the amount your organisation expects to earn (revenue) and spend for a financial year. Your budget can be for your current financial year or the next financial year.

If your request is successful, your organisation will be asked for an updated operating budget for the year ahead before receiving the next year’s payment.

Multi-year – project costs

A multi-year project budget showing all the costs to your organisation of delivering the total project (over multiple years), and any other funding your organisation may have gained to put towards the project’s delivery.

If your request is successful, your organisation will be asked for an updated project budget each year before receiving the next year’s payment.



 Note - Budgets are not required for the Community Internship Programme or the Lottery Individuals with Disabilities Fund

It is useful to remember in preparing your budget, that if your request is approved, you will be able to use the grant for any costs you have listed in your budget, except for:

  • any item that is not eligible
  • any cost that is excluded when the grant is approved.

What must a budget contain?

  • An operating budget shows your organisation's expected revenue and expenses for a financial year. If the grant you are requesting is for operating or running costs for your organisation and its services, you can submit your existing annual budget. This budget may be for the current financial year or the next financial year.
  • A project budget is for a project only and should not include your organisation’s operating costs. 
  • If you are requesting funding for a project and operating costs, check the grant scheme first to see if this is allowed. If you can request a grant for both, your budget should show the expected project income and costs, as well as the organisation’s budgeted expenses and revenue.
  • All budgets must clearly state the start and end dates for the period covered by the budget.

General tips about budgets

  • include all anticipated and confirmed income. List these items separately.
  • include all of your expected expenses. (If you spend the grant on costs that aren’t listed in your budget, you may have to repay the grant or part of it.)
  • for a project, list all of the project-related income and expenses, not just the amount you’re asking for.
  • it’s okay for a budget to show a loss if there are enough funds in reserve to cover it. You should add a note to the budget to make it clear that you intend to use reserve funds.
  • it’s a good idea to use last year’s accounts as a template for the operating costs. Update these costs for the year ahead.
  • if a grant is made, you can use it for any costs in your budget unless the online terms and conditions or grant agreement excludes a cost in your budget.

What is a translational research project?

Lottery Health Research will fund salaries and expenses for translational research projects that show the result is achievable, and will translate into better health outcomes and a community benefit for New Zealanders.

The Committee will provide up to $120,000 over two years. Project leaders may only hold one Lottery translational research grant at a time and only submit one Lottery translational research grant request per funding round.
For a translational project grant request, you need to provide:

  • a detailed project plan
  • CVs for each member of the research team
  • written evidence of approval from the relevant research ethical committee for their region and discipline, if applicable. 
  • a copy of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms or Biosecurity approval, if applicable.

Grant offers lapse after 12 months if the research project has not started.

What is shared research equipment?

Lottery Health Research will contribute costs towards shared research equipment, particularly equipment needed for several research programmes. This may include new or replacement equipment and installation expenses.

For a shared research equipment grant request, you need to provide:

  • quotes from suppliers
  • indicate which is the preferred quote.

Equipment purchased with the grant must become the property of the host organisation.

Grant offers lapse after 12 months if the equipment is not purchased.

Can organisations request support for Post-doctoral fellowships in health research?

Post-doctoral fellowships are available for a maximum of two years to those who received their PhD, and who have completed no more than two years post-doctoral research and/or study prior to the closing date. The fellowship will need to begin in the next academic year. The Committee provides up to $80,000 per year for post-doctoral fellowships, including salary costs

For a Post-doctoral fellowship grant request, you need to provide:

  • the CV and an official academic transcript of the proposed Fellow
  • a letter of support from the applicants Mentor
  • written evidence of approval from the relevant research ethical committee for their region and discipline, if applicable
  • a copy of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms or Biosecurity approval, if applicable.

Grant offers lapse after 12 months if the post-doctoral fellowship has not started.

Can organisations request support for PhD Scholarships in health research?

PhD Scholarships are available to support PhD students enrolled at a New Zealand university and planning a career in health research. The Committee provides up to $40,000 per year over three years to support a PhD scholarship, made up of a stipend of $30,000, plus fees of up to $10,000 each year.

Requests for part-time scholarships will be considered, on a pro rata basis.

For PhD Scholarship grant requests, you need to provide:

  • an official academic transcript of the proposed PhD Scholar
  • a letter of support from the applicant's Primary supervisor
  • written evidence of approval from the relevant research ethical committee for their region and discipline, if applicable
  • a copy of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms or Biosecurity approval, if applicable.

Grant offers lapse after 12 months if the PhD Scholarship has not started.

Organisations requesting grants for Post-doctoral Fellowships and PhD Scholarships in health research will be advised of the Committee’s decision before the end of the current calendar year.